Episode #018 Using Your Website To Grow Your Business (Website Basics: Part 2 – Mistakes & Costs)

 

Get ready to put everything you learnt in last week’s episode to good use! Amy reveals the 5 most common website mistakes and how to fix them, and exposes the hidden website-related costs that never occurred to you.

The real message of this podcast is, “A website needs to be more than  just pretty if you want it to be a lead-generating tool”

Podcast info

Episode: #018

Series: General

Host: Amy Hooke

Guest speaker: None

TopicWebsite Basics: Part 2

Transcript

Amy Hooke:
Good morning. Welcome back again, thank you so much for coming back to listen to part two of Website Basics. So as you may know, last week, I started my podcast on Website Basics. And I went overtime and I ran out of time, I didn’t get to do the second half. So this is the second half. If you missed the first half, then you can go back to the first Website Basics, number one, which was available on the podcast app, or on our website, thesavvybookkeeper.com.au/podcast. And I use a bit of a light-hearted way of explaining some complex things about websites that are usually a bit hard to understand. So I tried to make it a little bit of fun, hopefully you enjoy it. But just to take the mystery out of some of the terminology with websites, which I think is really important foundation for this webinar. Apologies, podcast. Got to remember I am right now.

Amy Hooke:
So let’s jump back in where I left off. So I’d talked about the website terminology and the different types of websites and how they’re used. And today, I’m going to talk about some of the very common mistakes that I see bookkeepers make on their websites. And I’m going to talk about how to fix those mistakes. And then I’m going to talk about the costs of websites. So I’m not just talking about how much it cost if you get someone to do a website for you, but how much a website can cost you if you do it yourself. There are a lot of costs and hidden costs associated with having a website. And so I’m going to go through what some of those are.

Amy Hooke:
Yeah, before I do that, I’d just like to actually go over a little bit of housekeeping. I don’t normally do this. But what I’ve done is I’ve set up a regular RSS feed to go out to all of our email subscribers. And so basically what it means is that every time a podcast gets launched on Monday, I believe it’s set up to send automatically to say that the latest podcast is coming out. Now I know how busy people get and how clutter that inboxes can get, especially on a Monday morning. So if you would like to stop receiving those notifications, we’ve inserted a link into the bottom of the podcast email, where you can just click on that link. And what it will do is it will remove you from the RSS feed for the podcast, but leave you to get out other emails. So that means you get emailed by us less, which will keep your inbox less clutter. But if you like to receive the notification still, then leave those on, we may change when they come through, I might actually shift those emails to come back on a Friday morning.

Amy Hooke:
We’ve been running the podcast, we start off at 7.00 am and then we moved it to 10.00 But I’m thinking I might move it back to that Friday morning. That way everyone can have a listen on Friday morning, nice and early on their way to work. And that could be a great way to end the week. But I’d love your feedback. If you prefer a Monday morning podcast [inaudible 00:03:00] or a 10.00 am Friday, you just let me know what works for you. Basically, all the feedback that we get, we take it onboard and listen to what suits you best. So we love to hear that feedback. So if you want to give some feedback, you can post it in the Facebook group, which is facebook.com/groups/thesavvybookkeeper. So we’d love to have you join the group as well. And the other thing you can also do, and I think this might be what some people prefer to do, you can subscribe to the podcast on whatever your favorite podcast app is.

Amy Hooke:
So we’re on Spotify, and we’re also on Google podcasts, and we’re also on the apple podcast app, which you can get on your iPhone. So if you subscribe via those methods, obviously, you’ll get notified when the latest episode comes out. And then that way you can keep your email free of clutter, and you won’t miss an episode. And the other little housekeeping that I have is that The Bookkeeping Project is still available. We still have a free version available. And you can now access The Bookkeeping Project community free of charge, which is thesavvybookkeeper.com/community. And you can join The Bookkeeping Project there. And we’ve also now released a premium membership for The Bookkeeping Project, which is very, very exciting.

Amy Hooke:
So our packages, start at $50 a month for the basic package, and then they go all the way up depending on which stage you’re at, you’ll be able to select a package with various types of inclusions ranging from templates, online training, mentoring, and also done for you, set up services on the higher end of the scale, we can actually … Part of The Bookkeeping Project is that you can engage with us for three, six or 12 months and we can set up as a project. Everything that’s kind of missing in your business, especially in the sales, marketing and pricing area, which is what we specialize in. So let’s get stuck into websites now that we’ve covered all of that, but if you are interested in that, the paid version of The Bookkeeping Project membership, then you can go to thesavvybookkeeping.com.au/project.

Amy Hooke:
Cool. Alright, so let’s start on the website. So where did we get up to? Okay, I guess what I want to say to start off with is that my first website sucked. So this isn’t a podcast where you’re going to hear all about how terrible you are at websites, I wanted to let you know that when I first started my website was awful. It wasn’t even a website, it was actually a blog. Now, I don’t know if you know what Blogger is, but it’s like a Google, think it’s owned by Google. And it’s a blog platform. And it’s very plain and ordinary, it’s really designed for blogging. But I turned it into a website by linking lots of pages together. And anyway, I sent it to my friend who was in public relations to ask her for feedback. And I think she must have been thinking, “Oh, my goodness, what is that?” But anyway, she said, “It’s a start, but you need to do a lot more work.”

Amy Hooke:
So basically, I was pretty crushed, because I put a lot of time into it. And then anyway, I got over myself and I said, “Well, could you give me some suggestions?” And she said, “You need to come up with a tagline.” And I thought, “What on earth is a tagline?” Which is so funny now because I actually helped my clients to write the taglines, which is so funny. And now I get to work with people who are just like I was, who have no idea how to write a tag line. So anyway, what I did was I googled, what is a tagline? Or how to write a tagline? And that was my very first research into the world of marketing and value propositions. So I’ll tell you after what a value proposition actually is, if you haven’t already heard of it. But basically, up until that moment, I’d never been exposed to marketing. I had a sales job when I was younger, one of my first jobs was a door-to-door, kitchen knife selling person. And so I used to go and do these knife demonstrations. And I still actually have my demo set, back from when I was about 16 years old.

Amy Hooke:
So I’ve just turned 38. So that’s a long time ago, and they’re still sharp. I have only had to have one of them re-sharpened in however many years that is, like 22 years. And so I don’t know, I’m good at sales. But I’m only good at sales if I believe that the thing that I’m selling is something worth selling. And so I’ve had a couple of jobs where I’ve sort of been in a sales role. And if I haven’t believed in the product, I haven’t been able to do well. But really, I’ll tell you what, there’s one thing that I believe in, and that’s why I’m good at selling it with and that is the value of bookkeeping to a small business, and also to our nation. Because bookkeeping is about … It’s not about data entry and record keeping. It’s about transparency. It’s about accountability. And it’s about great decision making.

Amy Hooke:
So when it comes to sales, bookkeeping is one of the services that I would most love to be able to sell to a business owner. I knew about sales, and I’d heard of marketing, but I had no idea. And so I entered the world of marketing back in whenever it was that I made this website. I reckon it was about early 2015. So when I started putting my own website together, I started or [inaudible 00:08:57] looking at taglines actually. I was looking at other bookkeepers, websites for inspiration. And I found something very interesting. I found inspiration. Now, please don’t send me hate mail or anything like that. But I mostly learned what not to do. That was the inspiration that I got. Because what I noticed was that every single website and I have to admit that bookkeepers’ websites have improved significantly since 2014, ’15.

Amy Hooke:
We’re talking four years later, there’s a huge difference. The rate that the technology is changing, and people. And then also I like to believe that at Savvy that we’ve had an impact on bookkeepers. We’re not the biggest website design company in the world by any measure. But I really believe that we have been able to on some level influence bookkeepers to be able to overcome some of these common mistakes, and to really start to bring their websites up to date. So what I noticed was these common mistakes. And so I started to make a mental note of all of those mistakes. And then as I was designing my own second website, I would do the opposite of what I saw all of the bookkeepers doing online.

Amy Hooke:
So one day, I had finished my website, and I decided to show some other bookkeepers in a Facebook group. I think someone had said, “Hey, can you share your website.” Or something? So everyone shared their websites, and to my surprise, I started getting messages. Oh, actually, I got one message. To start off with one message, I got a message from a bookkeeper. You know who you are, Terry Wilson. And so Terry sent me a message and she said, “I love your websites, you should actually do this professionally. Could you make me one?” And that’s how I got started in website design. I thought, “Well, I actually really love it.” Because the cool thing about websites, especially when you blend it with SEO is it’s about numbers. It’s about creating activity. It’s about design. It’s about problem solving, and structure. It’s sort of like, I don’t know, art and bookkeeping mixed together.

Amy Hooke:
To make websites for bookkeepers is like my absolute passion. That’s how I got into this because I love, I don’t know, I guess I have maybe in my right side of my brain is quiet lodge in terms of creativity. So I love the fact that I could still contribute to the bookkeeping industry, I could still sell a service bookkeeping, which I was passionate about. Yeah, to be able to do that was pretty cool. So anyway, it was quite funny, because after Terry contacted me, she didn’t end up getting her website for quite a while. So by the time she got her website done, I’d done a dozen other websites, which was kind of cool. But she was the person who inspired me to get started.

Amy Hooke:
And so anyway, I won’t share too much about my story, you can hear about that in other podcast episodes, especially towards the start Episode one, two, and three. But I’m going to share with you the mistakes that I’d seen. And it’s not to make you feel bad. But it’s to help you improve your website, and in turn to help you to sell what I believe, is one of the most valuable services in history. I was about to say in Australia, no in the world. No, okay, in all of history. And I’m not kidding. So my mission has been to help … It started off actually to provide a facelift of websites across the industry, because actually, at the start, I just thought bookkeepers websites really ugly, to be honest. I just thought they’re really outdated and that kind of thing. But now it’s transformed, now I’ve actually recognized that we can actually make a difference through what we do at Savvy now which is to help bookkeepers to identify, find and engage their ideal clients online.

Amy Hooke:
So anyway, as we go through, I mean, feel free to leave me any comments at the end. I’m happy to chat to anyone about this, especially if you relate to this. So I’m going to go through the mistakes that you’re making on your website and go through how to fix it. So obviously, I told you that my website sucked. And this was the first thing that I learned as I started trying to make my website not suck. I looked around to all the different bookkeepers websites. And what I started to notice is that they’re all the same. So mistake number one is that your website is the same as everybody else’s. Now the first mistake is going to become evident to you. All you need to do, you can do it right now, if you’re at your computer is open your browser, type in your suburb, and then the word bookkeeper and hit Enter. And then I want you to right click on the first five websites and open them up in different tabs. And then I want you to look at each one. And I guarantee you that most of them, if not all going to be outdated.

Amy Hooke:
So that’s the first thing. But the biggest issue is that they’re all the same. Now they might look different, but what you’re going to notice is that this thing that’s the same on each of them is the websites value proposition … Now, I did mention before that I’d explain to you what a value proposition is. So the value proposition, I’ll give you two examples. So the Savvy Bookkeeper, our value proposition is that we help savvy bookkeepers identify, find and engage their ideal clients, by creating pricing packages, websites and effective online marketing strategies to grow their business. We help our clients relate the overwhelm of trying to work outside their skill set. Our proven process draws out and captures their vision with an actionable plan to identify, find and engage their ideal client, and to achieve the results that they want.

Amy Hooke:
We support bookkeepers taking care of small business. So that’s the long version, I guess that includes the mission statement as well. And with off the hook bookkeeping … Actually the tagline that I came up with was, let’s do meaningful work. And it’s got nothing to do with bookkeeping. It’s just that one of my highest values is to do meaningful work, actually my very highest I used to do meaningful work. And so the unique selling proposition for off the hook bookkeeping is a virtual accounting bookkeeping and small business mentoring service designed to help you increase income, cut costs and reach your goals. We set up a fully functioning accounting system, and then help you to set financial goals related to your business so that you can do meaningful work with people who care.

Amy Hooke:
And so the thing about this value proposition is that in here, I’m not really talking about data entry and bass and that kind of thing. I’m giving them a promise that I’m going to help them increase their income and cut their costs and reach their goals. And then I’ve said how I’m going to do it, by setting up a fully functioning accounting system, and helping them to set goals related to their business. And then why? The reason why,, is so that they can do meaningful work with people that care. And so as you can see, inside that unique selling proposition, you can see that there are promises to what they get, and how we do it, and why we do it. And so we’re looking for people who have shared values with us. Because when we work with people who do have shared values with us, we can do a lot better work. I mean, if that’s something that’s important to you. So some people don’t care if their clients have shared values. But that’s just our specific value proposition, because that’s how we believe that we can get those kind of results.

Amy Hooke:
Now let me tell you the value proposition that’s on everybody else’s website. And this is why our website stands out. This is pretty much the value proposition of our entire industry. And I have actually talked about this in, I did an episode called PITA clients, where I really talked about the value proposition of our industry and are we really fulfilling on that? But this is the value proposition of our industry, in general. We take care of the bookkeeping, so that you can take care of business. That’s it. And that’s the value proposition that you’ll see on every bookkeepers’ website. Now, in that other episode, I didn’t talk about whether I believe that we do that or not. And I don’t necessarily believe that we always do a great job of fulfilling on this. But this is the long version of the value proposition that I see.

Amy Hooke:
I am a bookkeeper who helps small business owners with their bookkeeping, payroll and bass so that they can get their weekends back. We take care of the books and for you to take care of your business, family or life. Now in there, so firstly, I am a bookkeeper who helps small business owners. So firstly, it’s very generic. Okay, small business owners basically incorporates about 7,000,000 people. And then so you help them with their bookkeeping, payroll and bass so that they can get their weekends back. But how do you know they want the weekends back? For example. Maybe some people like working weekends, so I’m just making a point there. And then you’re saying, “We take care of the books and for you to take care of your business, family and life.”

Amy Hooke:
So there’s a lot of assumptions being made there, as to what the clients actually want. So we’re making a lot of big assumptions that the clients want this, this and this. And we also don’t tie in, there’s no connection in that value proposition statement to say, “Well, how does doing their bookkeeping, payroll and bass give them their weekends back?” Well, obviously, to us, it means that when we take up the bookcase off of their hands, they don’t have to work on the weekends anymore. But the silly thing about that is that if someone’s working on the weekends, it’s probably not really the bookkeeping that’s taking up the most of their weekends. Business owners have a lot of other things to worry about, aside from bookkeeping, like how to bring in new business and marketing their services. And, I don’t know, collections, obviously that can be part of the bookkeeping function, but like client paying clients. And then business owners have a lot of other things on their plate.

Amy Hooke:
So I don’t necessarily think if you take, let’s say, a couple of hours a week or a month off a client, you’re not giving them their week end back necessarily, might be for some [inaudible 00:19:39] who have these kind of, yeah, I don’t know, maybe they spend half a weekend or something doing their own bookkeeping. But I guarantee you that … So for me, when I hired, I hired a fantastic bookkeeper, and she works for me 10 hours a week. And I don’t know, if she saves me 10 hours a week, maybe I don’t know if she’s as quick as me or quick out. I don’t really know. And of course, it’s nice for me to have those 10 hours back, but I don’t really feel like, “Oh, wow, it’s so nice to have these 10 hours back.” I’m just like, “Oh, my goodness, there’s all these other things to do in that 10 hours.” The 10 hours is like a vacuum.

Amy Hooke:
So people don’t necessarily feel that you’re giving them their weekends back. So what I want you to start to think about is the value proposition, or you can make a promise to the results that you can deliver for a client. And that you tie in how you actually get those results and help it make sense. Because I think from the clients point of view. Imagine you’re a client and you’re a business owner enough. And you’re online, and you’ve [inaudible 00:20:44] bookkeeping your suburb and you’ve brought up those five same websites that you just brought up in your browser. And the client looks at each of the sites, and they go, “Oh, I can’t really see any difference between the sites, they’re all kind of saying the same thing. What are they going to do?” Well, if they see the same thing on everybody site, they only have one choice on how to try to compete, and that’s on price.

Amy Hooke:
Now, usually bookkeepers don’t have the process on their website anyway. So then that’s going to become very difficult for the client to compare on price. And that’s what they may want to do. So they’re going to contact you and say, “Hey, what are your prices?” Or they’re just going to go away. They’re just going to go, “Oh, well, they don’t have the process on their website.” And as you know, as a bookkeeper, you hate being compared on price. And why is that? Well, because you know that it’s not a true indication of your value. Yet, we can insist on presenting our websites in a way that are begging for us to be compared on price because we don’t differentiate ourselves. And I’ve had bookkeepers come to me, and they’re like, “Yeah, but all bookkeepers are the same. Aren’t they?” And you wouldn’t believe but I’ve worked with over 500 bookkeepers in the last nine months. And I’ve trained over 500 bookkeepers and I’ve worked privately, or in group sessions, with well over 100 bookkeepers. And I can tell you off the bookkeepers that I’ve worked with privately, I don’t find that many bookcases that are the same, to be honest.

Amy Hooke:
There’s so many different goals, and ways of setting things up. And business models and types of clients and types of people that bookkeepers like working with. There’s so many different moving parts. And so it’s really important that you accept that you are unique in the way that you do business, just because of the mere fact of the type of people you like working with and who you get along with. And then your skill set and the type of software that you use, and your location, all sorts of different things. So the solution to this problem … So the problem is remember, bookkeepers websites are all the same. So the biggest problem with that is that your website is probably the same as someone else’s. The solution is to understand your, I hate to say the N word, but your niche, and more so than understanding your niche, it’s about being yourself.

Amy Hooke:
So the solution is to be yourself. And it might sound easier than it actually is. But because it takes time to develop and discover your niche and your value proposition and to develop your website copy and the rest of your marketing copy. So when I say copy, I mean the writing around your website and your brand. And this can take years. So you better start today seriously, because it’s going to take a while, it takes a while to dig it out. Now for some people, I don’t know, it’s different for everybody. Some people I work with, and they just kind of get it on the first go. And other people, I’ll be working with them for over … Some of my clients I’ve worked with them over a year. Some people I worked with, I’ve got one client in particular, we’re up to about a year. In September we’ll be two years. And she’s just finished refining a value proposition statement because it keeps changing. So as she goes further and further into this journey, it’s changing. And it’s different for everybody.

Amy Hooke:
And it really depends how big your vision is, it really depends on … Well, I believe that we all have a life calling. And we all have a specific purpose, and it’s not going to be easy. Do you really think it’s going to be easy, but how many people are unhappy and miserable, not living out their life purpose. The reason for that is because it’s hard, it’s hard to figure it out. And so it can take years, but it will never happen if you don’t start today. And the best place to start is for you to admit that you don’t really know what your value proposition is. Now, you might be listening to this and thinking that you do. And maybe you do, and maybe you don’t.

Amy Hooke:
So some people who think they know what they’re doing, they discover, you know, through the proven process that I talked about before, that we take people through, it helps you to discover that. It will help you to know whether your true life purpose is aligning with your business mission and with your values. And so once you do that, you’ll be able to communicate this with your potential clients anywhere, including on your website. So imagine your value proposition was a little bit more like this. Have you ever wished that you could just hit the delete button, or a magic File button on the paper clutter that was lying around your office? Maybe you’ve been secretly planning to swipe it all the way into the bin and go on holidays. Don’t do it. We can help. Or how about this, are you having trouble finding your desk? Where is that piece of paper you’re looking for? It’s going to be around here somewhere.

Amy Hooke:
There’s nothing worse than being overwhelmed and unorganized, because it robs you of your peace of mind, clarity and ability to create. Now how much better is that than, “Hi, I’m a bookkeeper, I do best so you can get your weekends back.” Now, this is a conversational laid back style value proposition and it gets into the clients world and speaks that language and its natural. The best stock place to start to evaluate your value proposition is to use … I’ve got a little template which I’ll share with you. Okay, so it goes like this. Business plan … Sorry, it’s in the business plan. So it’s in my business plan template, which I’ll put a link to. So in there you can go down to the section called unique selling proposition which I don’t know, I think that’s the same as a value proposition. I don’t really know I’m not like, Yeah, whatever.

Amy Hooke:
So it goes a little bit like this. It says, “Business name.” So you put in your business name, is a business type that and then you choose from one of the options, helps, trains, teaches, equips or leads. And then a type of people or group of people to achieve a mission, solve a problem or pain point so that they can achieve their vision or business purpose. Okay, so it sort of goes like this. (Business name) is a (business type) that (helps trains teachers, equips and leads) and then (people, group) to (missions solve problem and pain point) so that they can (achieve their mission and purpose) that’s in brackets again. So what I’ll do is I’ll go on the website for this. Actually, wherever you’ve listened to the podcast, they’ll be a link. So you’ll be able to get the actual template because obviously when I read it, it doesn’t really make that much sense. So by using that formula, so let’s just put that into context. So business name is okay, off the hook bookkeeping is a business type, a virtual accounting bookkeeping and small business mentoring service that … So then in there you say what you actually do and for who.

Amy Hooke:
So it’s service designed to help you increase your income, cut costs and reach your goals. So I haven’t specifically outlined the type of business. So I’ve just made it personal, I’ve just said designed to help you. So I’m speaking to whoever the person is that’s listening to it. But then I like to qualify that. So at the end, I say, “So that you can do meaningful work with people who care.” So I’m saying you making it personal, basically to anyone. But when I get to the end, it’s like you person who wants to do meaningful work with people who cares, people who care. So the mission. So what we actually do, well the pain point that we solve. So what we do is we set up a fully functioning accounting system and help them set financial goals. Okay. So what we’re doing there is we’re outlining what we actually do. And then we go on to say why. So we tie in the why the thing that they actually want to achieve, and so hidden in the layers of that.

Amy Hooke:
So by going in and setting up a fully functioning accounting system, what we’re doing is we’re not promising them that we’re going to lock them into our bookkeeping service forever, we’re letting them know that we’re going to set you up with the system. So we want our clients to know that if they have a need to leave, to hire a staff member that tHey will be able to function. And we also let them know that our bookkeeping is not just about bookkeeping, but it’s about their financial business goals. So you’ll have the template, you’ll be able to download the business plan strategy template and find it in there, the unique selling proposition, about value proposition, and there’s no right answer. But start with the template, and over time, you will start to … You don’t have to fit in that exact format, but it helps you to brainstorm and it helps you to have a framework to get the information out of your head and put it onto paper.

Amy Hooke:
So Mistake number two bookkeepers websites are too wordy and full of jargon. So if you’re a business owner who’s looking for clarity, and help in their finances, but they can’t understand your website, they’re probably going to doubt that you can help them. So this is common, you’re going to notice when you bring up those five websites by typing in bookkeeper in your area, those websites, the ones that you don’t like they’re going to be … Well, actually maybe you like them, because you’re a bookkeeper. But you’re going to think of it from the client’s website. So think of someone who doesn’t know all the names of the bookkeeping terminology. So you might not see it because this is the language you use every day, but unfortunately, normal people don’t have a clue what it means. These are the types of words that I’m talking about. This is what you’ll see plastered all over bookkeepers websites, reconciliations. Okay, I reckon 90% of what bookkeepers do is reconciliations.

Amy Hooke:
The problem is clients don’t know what they are. They don’t know what it means. They don’t know what it’s for, and they don’t understand why they have to pay for it. Okay, so reconciliations, compliance, registrations, balance sheets, profit and loss statements, activity statements, tax practitioners board, bass agent, these are some of the words that you’re going to see on bookkeepers websites. And it’s so funny, I just actually googled bookkeeper in my suburb. And the coolest thing about that is that apart from a franchise bookkeeping company, my bookkeeping business, off the hook bookkeeping is the only bookkeeping business that lists on all of page ones, the rest is all directories. So you’ve got one fled, geora, sake.com, indeed.com, yellow pages.com.

Amy Hooke:
And then you’ve got off the hook bookkeeping twice. So there you go. I’m completely, because I’ve done my homework, and I know I’m really good at SEO as well, but I’m dominating. I’m dominating the first page, which is really cool. So I went on there to actually grab a bookkeeping businesses website, so I could read out some of the common words that I was seeing all over the page. But anyway, so turns out, it’s just me, which is great. Yeah, so basically, but I have brought up this franchise, this website, and it’s just like, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, bank reconciliation, blah, blah, blah, data entry, blah, blah, blah PAYG. Yeah, there’s nothing there that you can connect with for me. And that’s just my opinion, but I’m a business owner, and I’ve had to go through the process of hiring bookkeepers. So I’ve done a couple of, I have done, yeah, I think PRTA clients podcast, I talked about that as well. So anyway.

Amy Hooke:
So unfortunately, everyday people don’t know what this stuff means. Now, of course, you need to mention those things. But you need to say it in a simple way. And also, there’s a place for it, you don’t need to put it right there in the person’s face on the homepage. So the other thing that I’ll put into this category is making the website very wordy and cluttered. So it makes it really hard to read. Now, I don’t know if you realize, but the average reading age for online. So I don’t know about you, but I don’t know if you find it hard to read online. But when computers and the internet first started becoming very popular, I remember trying to write on the computer, and it’s just horrible. But the reason that it’s easy to read on the computer these days is because people realize that you have to write for four year olds, in order to … Not four year olds, grade four level in order for people to be able to most understand it.

Amy Hooke:
And I can tell you right now, it’s also the fonts that make a difference. So when I go on bookkeepers websites, the line spacing, the line height is very low. So the words are very close together, the font is always Ariel or something like that. So it’s a font that’s kind of small and hard to read. And then the font size is really little, 10 point or something. So I’m saying you got to go like 14 to 16 point, you’ve got to do at least 1.5 lawn spacing. And you need to use a nice, round font, like we use Avenue because it’s so nice and easy to read the letters are nice and big, and it’s easy. And so the other thing that bookkeepers have on their websites as well is too many moving parts, okay? The sliders have got to go. Anything that flashes is going to make people close their browser.

Amy Hooke:
So it might be cool and cute for you, and you might think it’s all funky. But for someone who’s looking for information and trying to connect with you, as a bookkeeper, they’re not going to like that. So the solution is to speak in everyday language and please get to the point. Okay, keep it simple. Clarity attracts, confusion repels. And the more clear and concise and straightforward you can be on your website to better. Use short sentences, everyday language, lots of space around your words, break up the words with pictures, make it easy on the eye. And your goal is not to try and cram a novel onto your website, you don’t have to tell them everything, you just have to make them want to contact you. So save your lengthy content for your blog, which is actually good for business. It’s good for Google. And if you want to say more, put it in your blog.

Amy Hooke:
So that brings me to mistake number three, which is that your website is all about you. This leads me … This is the third common mistake that I’ve seen in the industry. So a lot of bookkeepers, I know like book as bookkeepers, we think that we need to talk about all of our qualifications, and all of our skills and stuff like that on our website. But the thing is, it’s like I don’t think we’re actually doing it to boast about how qualified and clever and organized we are, but many websites focused on showing off all the memberships and software logos, and awards that you’ve won and things like that. There’s nothing wrong with logos, okay. And there’s nothing wrong with having things there for credibility. That’s not what I’m talking about. But there’s a place for it. It’s called the [inaudible 00:36:43] page. Okay. So the clients need to know, they what you’re doing, can you help them? And do you actually care about their problems?

Amy Hooke:
It’s very easy to start talking yourself up and trying to make them want to hire you, but it actually works the opposite. And so they’ll probably leave your site, not really feeling sure that you actually understand them and care. So the solution for this is that your website needs to be all about your client, big tip here is to relate it back to them. Whatever you say, if you say this, this, this about us, then you have to say, “And as a result, this, this, this about you.” So if you display, for example, an ABN logo, Australian Bookkeepers Network, you want to say to yourself, “Okay, do I actually use my membership?” And if not, why put the logo on your website? Do you know what I mean? How does this help the client? If you have a membership that you don’t use, and you put the logo on your website, to me that’s stupid.

Amy Hooke:
Now, I know it’s a status thing, so chartered accountants do this. I’ve heard so many chartered accountants, they say that the Institute of Chartered Accountancy, the membership is actually just rubbish. It’s not even helpful. Of course, they’re still going to put the logo on the website, because it’s about status. But guess what, people today, especially the younger generation that’s coming through, the millennials that are flooding into the world of business, they don’t care. They don’t care if you’re a chartered accountant, they care if you can help them. “Can you get me results? Great. Let’s work together.” “Do you have an Australian bookkeepers network logo and your website? I don’t care. I don’t care if you have a logo on your website, it means nothing to me. But if you need to put that logo on there, then you need to say how does that logo help them.

Amy Hooke:
So you need your word your paragraphs and sentences. So even if you begin by saying something about yourself, finish the sentence with how it benefits the business and solves their problem. So whenever you write something, if you write, “I have these qualification.” Ask yourself, “So what?” And then show that you care and understand that what the client needs, and don’t just tell them how fantastic you are even if you’re fantastic.

Amy Hooke:
And then mistake number four is something that I actually mentioned in our value proposition savvy, which is bookkeepers trying … It’s about trying to do things outside of your expertise. Now, you might think, because I’m a website designer, and I would absolutely love to work with you that I’m saying this to trick you. But honestly, I’m not. So think about this scenario. Remember, the last time your client said to you, “But bookkeeping’s easy, I can do it myself. Plus, I want to save money.” And you imminently thought to yourself, “If you do it yourself, it’s going to cost you in the long run, please don’t do it yourself, please let me do it.”

Amy Hooke:
And then the client refused to believe you and said, “Oh, but I want to do it myself anyway to try and save money.” Or, “I like doing it.” And then the client went ahead and tried to do their own bookkeeping for a month. And then they came back and then they said, “You were right.” And then you had to fix their mistakes, and it cost them twice as much, than if you’d done it for yourself. And then they were annoyed with you and left you to find another bookkeeper. Because they didn’t want to pay the fees. Has that ever happened to you before? I’m only saying this because I’ve experienced this myself. Right? How annoying is it? Now I’m telling you right now, it’s no different with websites. And I’m not saying you can’t DIY. In fact, I’ve seen some bookkeepers that have done a good job of doing their own website, the website looks beautiful.

Amy Hooke:
So I’m not saying you have to pay me or someone else, otherwise your website is going to be terrible and ugly. I will actually go through, because I’m going to talk to you about the costs and hidden costs and some things that you’ve never thought of. There are lots of things to know about a website that a professional can help you with that you cannot possibly do on your own. Okay. Now, if you’re saying to me, “Yeah, but I’ve made a website [inaudible 00:40:48] .” I don’t even care how pretty your website is. I know we’ve talked about websites looking ugly and outdated. But pretty websites don’t actually help because you also want a website that works. Because remember, in the last podcast Website Basic one, I talked about whether your website is an online brochure or website that actually generates leads. Which kind of website do you want? Do you want a website that generates business? Or do you want a website that just looks pretty that no one ever sees?

Amy Hooke:
Okay, because if you want a pretty website that no one ever sees, just go on Fiverr and pay a couple hundred bucks for someone to make your pretty website. Okay. So the solution to this is to get advice or help from someone who knows what they’re doing. A professional can help you with all sorts of different things. I’m not just talking about the website design, I’m talking about professional marketing copy or copywriting to help you sell your services on your website. And I’m talking about search engine, marketing. So SEM search engine marketing, so that includes SEO, which means search engine optimization, which basically means stuff that makes you get found on Google. And then there’s Google AdWords, which is pay per click marketing, there’s Facebook ads, which can point to your website. But it’s not just those. It’s not just those types of things that help your website to get found. But it’s also about the design and the layout and the flow of the website.

Amy Hooke:
So it’s not about looking pretty, it’s about, is the person able to go on a journey? Do they know where to go? Is there a clear call to action? Do they know what to do and where to click? And what’s the best step for them to take? Is it really clear for them to navigate their way around? And do know where to go next? If your website looks great, and you do it yourself? And even if you enjoy writing, and you enjoy selling, most bookkeepers don’t, but some do. I don’t want to pigeonhole anybody. So you might manage to choose some good photos and make the website look nice. But then you’ve got all the backend stuff.

Amy Hooke:
So the SEO, the keyword planning and research, you have to think about how you’re going to get potential new clients to find your side, aside from giving people your business card at networking meetings. Because if you’re not appearing in a Google search or on the maps, then nobody’s going to find you. So I guess probably a lot of bookkeepers can figure out how to get there. Google My Business Listing up. So if you don’t have a Google My Business Listing, you should set one up and put yourself on the map. You don’t have to point it right to your house, but you can put it in a general area. But do you know how to get yourself to rank on Google? So on the first page, yes, you might be able to get your yourself on the map, but the extra credibility that comes.

Amy Hooke:
So you’re going to get gain extra credibility, and probably 30% of the people who visit that search term are going to click on your link if you’re on that first page, in the top three. So those who have done a good job visually need to, they might find their need to hire a professional copywriter or an SEO person. So I’ve had quite a number of bookkeepers. So they’ve gotten a quote from us, and they’ve thought, “Oh, your website’s too expensive.” They’ve gone to another provider who hasn’t done any SEO, and then they come back to us and have to pay almost the cost of an entire site to get us to do the copywriting in the SEO. Because the SEO and the copywriting is the expensive part. Because that’s the bit that helps you get found. And so this sort of stuff, this can cost you 1000, 2000, 3000. For good copywriting and SEO, it can cost you thousands of dollars.

Amy Hooke:
So it’s really important that you get advice before, don’t just fall for, “Oh, we can make pretty sites.” You need to know if the person can help you to rank on Google and I know they’re website designers in our industry, that say SEO is not important. And the reason they say that is because I don’t know how to do it. So I love SEO, and I love the competitiveness of it. It’s kind of fun, but I’ve researched my competitors and all of their clients websites, and they don’t rank. So it is really important that you understand how to do that. And so I’ve been doing SEO for yeah, since about … Well, 2015, I built my own site, and I did great on Google, because I built a 17, 17 page size. So the more pages you have, the more opportunity you have to rank. B

Amy Hooke:
But I didn’t know how to do it, I didn’t know how to make it happen. So what I did was I did some training with Kate Toon who’s one of the best SEO people in Australia. And through doing some training and yeah some mentoring with her, I was able to learn. Because I said to her, “I don’t know how to make it happen. I don’t know how to do on purpose what I have done by accident with off the hook bookkeeping. ” [inaudible 00:46:00] So I said, “I don’t want it to be a fluke, I want to be able to get clients for our clients.” And so now probably on average even at small websites, it’s harder to rank for small site, but even a small websites, they generate about $15,000 a year of additional recurring income.

Amy Hooke:
And the final mistakes that I want to talk about is mistake number five. Biggest mistake, this is the biggest mistake, using unoriginal content. I have to reinforce this, this is the number one, I should put this is number one, but I left it to last because this is the worst thing you can possibly do if you want your website to rank on Google. So what I what I mean by on original content. Now I’m not implying that anyone is out there plagiarizing, that would be illegal. Although I have seen it happen, I had a client who we did her website. This is the only client that I’ve ever had, who has actually left us. And it was the weirdest thing ever. But this person came to me asked for a website. And then they googled themselves.

Amy Hooke:
So by the way, when you Google yourself, it’s biased because it’s always biased by your own location. And the fact that you’ve googled yourself before. So you need to use a proper Google rank tool to search where your actual Google rank is or the very least use an incognito or private tab, so it doesn’t track your location. Okay, so what this client did was they Googled their business name, and then they contacted me, and they said, “I Google My Business name, and I’m not coming up on the first page.” And I thought to myself, I actually said to her, “No one’s going to Google your business name.” And she said, “Well, what if I meet someone at a networking meeting, and they Google My Business name?” And I’m like, “Well, you will have given them you’ll be business card.” Anyway, it was just a bit of a strange thing. So it doesn’t matter if someone … People are not really going to Google your business name. But then I had a little bit of a look into it. And then it turned out, so I think it just took a little bit of time to propagate.

Amy Hooke:
But I said to her at the time, “Yeah. But you rank for bookkeeper in your suburb and bass agent in your suburb? That’s way better, because people who don’t know you, who are looking for you, they’re not going to know your business name to type it in. Just like, “Yeah, but what about with networking?” I’m like, “So this person built a website, just in order for people who might have lost their business card to be able to Google her and find her. I just thought, I don’t know, I thought it was a little bit silly. But anyway, I just said to her, “Well, look, these.” So I went through and I sent her a report of the Google ranks that she had, that way to achieve just from their initial SEO. She hadn’t purchased any ongoing SEO work. So it was literally just the initial setup, and then hope for the best.

Amy Hooke:
So anyway, she said, “I’ve met someone at a networking meeting. And they’ve offered to do a new site for me.” And I thought, “So strange.” She paid me, she asked me to actually do add some additional stuff to a site. And then she ended up saying, “I actually I found someone else to do it.” And then what she did was she hired someone, and that person copied my site, identically. So they identically copied my site, well, they copied the way the site works. And they copied the text on the page and all of the images, so they copied the complete design. But they didn’t do the SEO. So they didn’t do all the backend stuff. They didn’t do all of the optimizing of the images and all of the background things that you need to actually do.

Amy Hooke:
And then they made the biggest mistake, which is mistake number five, they used unoriginal content. And I’m not talking about them copying my content, which I just thought, “Oh, well. I don’t know. I don’t care. Just copy my side and put your name on my work.” That was fine, but the bit that I was upset about was what happened to her Google rank. So because her website was being tracked in our online software and I saw … So she was ranking for quite a number of good keywords, she completely lost all of her Google rank. And part of the reason would have been so they didn’t do the background SEO, the meta descriptions and titles and optimize the images and that kind of thing. But the other thing that they did was this critical mistake. They went and they copied blog posts from other websites, and then posted it on that person’s blog with a tiny little link down the bottom, just linking to where they’d copied the blog from.

Amy Hooke:
Yeah, this is a big bad mistake. This is called duplicate content, duplicate content makes Google go, “Hey.” Google’s really smart, they crawl the web every day with their little spiders or whatever. I didn’t know why they were called spiders. But because it’s the web, it’s a spider on the web. But anyway, whatever. I just figured that out. But yeah, so basically, the spiders crawl through. And every part of the site is indexed and they look for patterns. And guess what Google goes, “Hey, this is an unoriginal blog post, they’ve copy this blog post from somewhere else.” And then you actually lose your Google rank, you actually get penalized by Google. And now this person has no visibility on their ranking for any of the keywords, They’ve completely dropped off the radar. And I just think, and so I’m not like, “I told you so lady.” At all, I feel sad.

Amy Hooke:
Well, I feel really sad, because I know that, you know, the service that we offer is really good. And this one person, they went and not only did their new website design, plagiarized my website, but they also copied blog posts from another website and put it on there and made them lose their entire Google rank. And I just thought, “This is really sad. This is the sort of stuff that I try and work hard.” And it’s really hard, because bookkeepers don’t really understand SEO and how it works. And it’s hard to sort of explain it, it’s like explain bookkeeping to a business owner. Yeah, so that really broke my heart, because I thought, “This was such a lovely person. I’d met her out one day at a business networking meeting, and I knew that I could help her and I’d already done a good result for her. And if she hadn’t been patient enough just to wait a little bit longer, she would have been getting business through the site.”

Amy Hooke:
So some of our clients hadn’t generated their first client through the website for 12 months, which is really disappointing, whereas others, they get clients within the first month. So it’s different for everyone. It really depends on your location, that kind of thing. But she was in a great location, if she had just waited a little bit longer. She was ranking for really good suburbs, and yeah, anyway, it’s quite sad. But the point that I’m bringing you to is about duplicate content. So the hardest thing about it is because bookkeepers always say, “Oh, I’d love to write a blog. But bookkeepers don’t really like writing.” And so we do all the writing for our clients.

Amy Hooke:
And so what happens is there’s other companies out there that offer, they say, if you sign up and get us to do your website or this services that you can go to directly now, when you get access to an entire content of blog posts, that you can just automatically post on your website. And so lots of bookkeepers I’ve been speaking to as I do quotes for them and that kind of thing, they’re like, “Oh, yeah, I’m going to sign up to these marketing service where you can pick a blog and you’re having post blog posts, and I’m like, “Oh, my gosh, I’m going to cry.” These are called blog farms. So blog farm’s like the worst most damaging thing for your website whatsoever. So that’s why our competitors clients websites don’t have any Google links. Because what they do is they use blog farms to … So bookkeepers get their sites done. And then they plug into these this. Yeah, they plug into these so-called marketing system. And then from there, what happens is, so you’re pulling out blog posts and re-posting them on your website.

Amy Hooke:
And so I’ve searched a lot of these blog posts in the plagiarism check out and I’m not saying that they plagiarized, but the plagiarism checker actually pulls the internet and finds all of the websites that that blog post has been posted on before. And I’ve found some of the blog posts that get given to bookkeepers to repost on their website, these blog posts are being re-posted, like for 20, 30, 40, 50 other bookkeepers’ websites. This is so, oh my gosh, I can’t even access dry, how bad this is. Not that it’s an exaggeration. But I need to try, I don’t know how to emphasize it enough how bad this is for your organic SEO.

Amy Hooke:
Now, not only is it bad for your organic SEO, so some people don’t care about ranking on Google, they say, “Oh I just want to build my network by re-posting on Facebook and posting blog posts.” I can tell you as well, from a business owners perspective, those types of blog posts are the most boring blog posts you will ever read in your entire life.” They are like canned blog posts, it’s like saying, “Oh, I’ve got a can of spam, and now I’m going to have that for my Christmas roast dinner.” It’s like, “No, get a proper piece of [inaudible 00:55:39].”

Amy Hooke:
And the reason that I’m saying that is because when people come to your website, they want to hear your voice. They don’t want to [inaudible 00:55:46] like canned blog posts. Because those blog posts don’t add any value to people whatsoever. It’s super generic, and it’s not helpful information. So what you want to do is you want to write stuff, you want to write your opinion, you want to write about your expertise. And you might not have time for that. So we offer blogging as a service, and people will keep [inaudible 00:56:13], “Oh, that’s so expensive for blog post.” Blog posts are expensive. So it’s not necessarily good to have that as part of your entire marketing strategy. But to write your own blog posts, and there’s ways that you can do it cheaper than hiring someone to do it. But if you’re not good at writing, then what we do with our clients is we get them to record topics, and then we transcribe it and turn it into an interesting blog post.

Amy Hooke:
And we can do that from very little information, we include the client’s tone of voice, and then the expertise of the client and these type of blog posts help you to connect. But if possible, writing your own blog post is good, if you have the time to do that, or engage someone to do it. And if you don’t have the funds to do that, the best option is don’t do it at all, you are better off not doing any blogging at all, than grabbing from a blog farm and re-posting it on your website because of the damage. So the solution to this problem is use original content and develop a blog post strategy. If you want to have a blog, develop a strategy, and the way to do that is through planning at the keywords where your rank needs to get a bit of a boost. So what you would do is you look for the keywords that are the least competitive, but still have a decent amount of searches where your rank is somewhere already on the scale.

Amy Hooke:
So let’s say you’ve got a keyword where you’re on page three, and it’s not a super competitive keyword, then you write a blog post about that keyword and it will boost you up hopefully to page one, you might need to do one or two or just to optimize those blogs afterwards, which is that double check the keywords, re-do the meta titles, make sure you optimize the images and that kind of thing. So the best way to do it is to plan which keywords you’re going to tackle. And then pick a topic, and then do one each month or do them in a batch and then post them. So I do mine in batches. I do my SEO research on Saturday mornings, I do a bit of look around on the topics that I want to talk about, I talked about topics that I’m interested in. But they’re also topics that help me sell my services. So you can go have a little bit of a squeeze at my website and see how I’ve done my blog.

Amy Hooke:
My blog is intentional. The purpose of my blog is to connect with clients and to rank on Google. And it’s part of my SEO strategy. So I’m targeting keywords with those blog posts. So you can go to offthehookbookkeeping.com.au/blog and have a look at the approach that I’ve taken there. But you don’t need to blog every single week. Firstly, that’s going to cost you a fortune. You can expect if you do your own blogging, it’s going to cost you a couple of hundred dollars per blog, even if you do it yourself, because of the time that you spend writing it, editing it, finding photos, posting it, transcribing it if you need to do that. So that’s something to consider as to whether you think that’s a good return. So I think it’s better probably more like once a month is good for a bookkeeper.

Amy Hooke:
You don’t have to go one month by one month by one month. What you can do is you pick your 12 topics, you write them all up maybe in batches of three or four or whatever. And then you just post them all over, you post them on a weekly basis for a little while. You don’t have to put the date on the blog post or you can, it’s completely up to you. You should put the author a lot of these generic blog posts that come from these blog farms. Normally people post them and they don’t say who the author is, and there’s no date. And then when people go on there, they’re just like, “Oh, this is a bit weird and kind of creepy.” So yeah, it’s just weird. It just seems like it’s come from a database. So you want it to be like a real blog, and you want it to be fresh content. So if you can, get a batch of blogs ready so that you’ve got that foundation that’ll target those keywords.

Amy Hooke:
And then even if you can just post a new one every quarter, at the least, but monthly would be great as well. So have a think about that, but make sure you use original content, don’t take shortcuts. If you’re going to take shortcuts, you may as well not do it, you may as well come up with a different marketing strategy. And so that’s the end of that section with all of the mistakes and the solutions to those mistakes. So hopefully, that’s been really helpful for you. And now I just want to quickly go through the costs and the hidden costs that you’ve probably not necessarily thought of. Some of them I’ve already mentioned, like, obviously, SEO, if you get a website done and that they haven’t included SEO, you’re going to be forking out afterwards. That’s just the reality.

Amy Hooke:
So the following costs that I’m going to give you are all based on a basic five page websites. And I feel that they’re on the conservative side, but they give you a little bit of an idea of what you can expect to pay for a website. So firstly, a five page … I’ve heard people say that they got a website for $100 on Fiverr, and that’s fine. But a decent website could cost you somewhere between, let’s say $800 and $1500. A website that’s done by a decent designer is probably going to be more like two and a half thousand to four and a half thousand and some people charge four and a half thousand dollars with no SEO or anything else. Okay, so that’s just a bit of a guide. Then you’re looking at two rounds of reviews. So what happens is when they design the website, you only get to make too lots of changes, okay, you can’t just keep changing it forever.

Amy Hooke:
So you need to know what you want beforehand, okay. So you need a bit of a plan, then there’s images. So if you’re going to have one image per page, images can set you back anywhere between 10 and $30 each unless you know where to find some good free images online. So I think check out on splash website, which is cool. Then you’ve got graphics, if you want graphics. If you want a logo, to get a good logo, you probably want to pay, some people get … Again, Fiverr, I recommend going for a proper graphic designer, because you need to get all the files and the different … You need to get the original files, you need to make sure that they’re high resolution. Yeah, you need to make sure that you get the right types of logo so that it displays properly on the website.

Amy Hooke:
So make sure if you go to one of those cheap designers on Fiverr, which is … Then just make sure that you get all of the original files and that you have the ownership of that. So normally you’re not paying five for that normally, they add on a couple hundred bucks. So you can expect to pay probably 300, even up to 1500 for a good logo. But let’s say around the three to five or $600 mark. Then you need to get a contact formal location map, you need to connect your Google Analytics. So you’re looking at probably a couple hundred dollars, each for them linking in your social media. I’m just saying this is what a website designer could charge you to do the extra stuff, or you can do it yourself. But then we’re looking at the copywriting. So these are very conservative, you’re looking at least $1,000 for copywriting. But if you want a good copywriter, maybe 1500, 2500. Some copywriters will charge you $1000 per page, it just depends.

Amy Hooke:
So then to do your initial SEO, so sometimes just for an SEO strategy, you can pay 1000, $1500. If you want someone to actually implement it, you can be paying 2500. So I’m talking, if you get yourself a cheap hundred dollar website, and then you have to add all of those other things, you could pay at least another 2500, maybe even more, maybe 3000 $4,000. And again, it comes down to what your goals are, if you’re happy with an online brochure, that’s fine. But if you’re wanting lead generation, you have to start thinking differently about it. Okay, so that’s the upfront costs of setting up the website. Then you’ve got your ongoing costs. So you’ve got your hosting, your SSL certificate, your domain name registration. And those types of costs. So cost hosting can cost you anywhere from let’s say, $120 a year up to about $400 a year.

Amy Hooke:
Your domain name is can be, I guess you can get them for about nine or $10. But usually that’s only for the first year and then it goes up. So maybe you’re looking around $25 per year, just look out. Some companies charge $120 per year [inaudible 01:04:33]. You don’t need to pay that much ever. Then you’ve got your SSL certificate. So all websites need to have that. So that’s the security for your website. So you’re looking at probably 100, 250. Some companies give free SSL certificates away with their hosting. And then you’ve got ongoing management costs. So if something goes wrong, also you need to keep WordPress sites updated. So the time that you will spend on that, you’ll probably spend an hour or so every month, which if your hourly rates that industry average $65, that’s going to add 65 to $130 a month to your costs. Just in you keeping those types of things updated. And then if you break something on the site, then you need to get help with that.

Amy Hooke:
And then you’ve also got the costs involved in linking your DNS records, which is about connecting your domain name with your email addresses and things like that. So there’s a few different costs involved in there. And it’s just good because a lot of people can be … They can get surprised by these costs, then you need to actually get traffic to come to your website. So then you’ve got ongoing SEO costs, which can set you back $500 a month, that’s just a small cost. Some people charged 1500, some people will charge two and a half thousand, SEO can get really expensive, then you might want to look at AdWords or Facebook ads to get traffic to your website. And then as I said before, you’ve got your logo costs.

Amy Hooke:
So you could do a DIY logo on [inaudible 01:06:06] almost maybe free, even under $100. But you could do it for free, and they usually don’t look very professional. You could get a Fiverr but again, a Fiverr is usually going to end up costing you $50. But if you want to get all your files, you’re probably going to pay a couple hundred anyway. So a professional logo, you’re looking at the three to $600 Mark, and then I think that’s very conservative, a great logo can cost you upwards of $1,000. But it just depends on your goals. And this doesn’t even include advertising costs, like Google AdWords, ad spend, Facebook ad spend like that, to manage AdWords and that kind of thing. There’s ongoing fees for that plus you have to pay for the actual ads itself.

Amy Hooke:
So as you can see, a website is something that … For example, I was working with one of my clients yesterday and he said, “I need help with my website, I need to upgrade it.” And I’m like, “No.” I said, “Look, I’d love to sell you a website, but I don’t think you need it right now. At the moment we’re working on your pricing, we need to finish these packages. Once you get your existing clients onto these new packages, your income is going to increase probably by about 20%.” Which is about the average that our client’s income increases when we help them get on to their new packages. And then the next step is to free up some of his capacity. So I said, “You don’t need a website yet. That’s not …” I think in The Bookkeeping Project and at Savvy, we’re all about doing business in the right order.

Amy Hooke:
So if you’re not able to take on new clients, then you don’t necessarily need to get a website. Do you know what I mean? You need to think about what are the next steps? So the best way to figure out the next steps is to get a copy of our business planning strategy and just start working through it. And then once you hit a point where you need some help just come and have a chat, we have a few different ways that you can connect to get support with that. But go through that, because that will tell you the order that you need to do things in and website comes under item three. We’ve got step one, business plan, step two, pricing, step three, marketing, step four, sales and onboarding. And then step five is about your bookkeeping services and improving those services and your workflow and that kind of thing. And then step six is team.

Amy Hooke:
So that’s kind of the general order that we recommend to do things in. If you haven’t sorted out your pricing then don’t focus on your website yet. But if you’re full up, don’t focus on a website. Whereas if you’re at the point where you’re wanting to grow, you’re wanting to generate leads, we help Savvy Bookkeepers to identify, find and engage their ideal clients online. Yeah, so if you’re interested, please get in touch. For a short amount of time, maybe over the next week, I’m going to offer a free consultation for website design. So I’ll put the link in, you can book a free website content planning session, and what we’ll do is I’ll help you work out your value proposition statement. And once you get your value proposition statement, you’re going to find putting the website, getting the website content developed is going to be a lot easier.

Amy Hooke:
So anyway, we’d love to help you with that. Me and my team can help you to go through that process of uncovering that value proposition statement. So you can start to do that. So yeah, if you’re interested in, if you’re exploring whether a website is right for you at the moment, definitely book in that session. And if you haven’t joined The Bookkeeping Projects community, please join that. That’s the free version of The Bookkeeping Projects, you can connect with different bookkeepers at various stages of their business. We’ve got startups, full ups, move ups and wind ups and of course, the people who are in the fed up category as well, people who are trying to figure out whether they want to do, even do bookkeeping anymore, which is quite a fun, not fun stage of business to be at.

Amy Hooke:
Anyway, thank you so much for your time again, I always love spending time with you. Whether it’s on a Friday morning or a Monday morning, whether you’re driving in your car or sitting in your office, I thank you so much. I’ve gotten so much good feedback from people that they’re enjoying the podcast and yeah, just enjoying these times together. Investing in your business and taking the time out to do things differently. And so I’m very excited.

Amy Hooke:
Next week we’re going to be talking, there’s going to be myself and two other bookkeepers from our industry. We have a very exciting topic to talk about, we’re going to be talking about STP Single Touch Payroll, hurrah. But it’s not going to be one of those boring dry compliance type webinars, we’re going to be talking about how you can add additional revenue streams to your business, how you can optimize your workflow, and we’re going to be talking as well about some of our Done-For-You and DIY services around STP. So anyway, I’ll look forward to seeing you next week. See you then. Goodbye.